You Look Marvelous!

My future daughter-in-law loves mirrors — the bigger the better. We have been to dozens of stores looking, but have been unable to find the perfect mirror at the right price. In the meantime, I thought I could alter one a bit so she has something pretty to check her outfit each morning.

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Mirrors, you should know, are rather challenging to photograph, so my chickens helped me out with this one …

I started with an inexpensive (about $15) full-length mirror. It had a bit of a Greek detail to the frame, so I opted for a Greek-inspired flourish from a Cricut cartridge to decorate the top and bottom of the mirror. The process is so simple …

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First, cut the image out on etchmask. This is an adhesive vinyl made by etchall. It is thicker than Cricut’s vinyl, which means it is less likely to tear and the Cricut doesn’t cut all the way through the backing paper, so everything stays together until you take it apart.

I did two images … one for the top and one for the bottom. I reversed and flipped the bottom image before cutting it out.

Next, remove the entire piece of etchmask from the cutting mat and cover with a transfer sheet cut to the same size. (etchmask comes with the transfer sheets, so there is nothing extra to buy!) Carefully remove the backing from the etchmask and adhere it to your surface. The transfer sheet holds it all together for you. Once adhered to the mirror, carefully remove the transfer sheet, as seen in the photo above.

Now, use the etchall Squeegee to work out all of the air bubbles and make sure the vinyl is adhered well.

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Now use a pick or piercing tool to pull out the design. Tip: Start in the center of the image and pull it out from there.

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If your image is too close to the edge, add washi tape, masking tape or painter’s tape. You do not want to get the etchall anywhere else on the glass. Then, use the squeegee to apply a thick, even coat of etchall.

Wait 15 minutes, then scoop up all of the etchall with the squeegee and put it back in the bottle — it is reusable.

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Since this project was so large, I used wet paper towels to clean off the rest of the etchall and then carefully removed the tape and stencils.

Here’s how it turned out …

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Are you ready to decorate a mirror of your own? etchall is ready to help you … use the code CANDYS and you will get 10% off your entire order — including premade stencils if you do not have a Cricut or other electronic cutter. Click here and get etching today!

NOTE: I received compensation for this post.

Holiday Candy Jar

xmas jar by candy spiegel8I know it’s 85 degrees outside, but I was in a bit of a holiday mood and etchall was calling my name … I recently accepted a position as an elite etchall ambassador so you will see plenty more etchall projects to come ….

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I love to reuse food containers — especially jars. This one was previously filled with artichoke hearts.

xmas jar by candy spiegel2I used a die from Elizabeth Craft Designs to cut vinyl (this is from Cricut) to create the design. However, since I wanted the trees and landscape to be snowy and etched, I used the leftover part of the vinyl, rather than the part the die actually cut out. (I hope that makes sense) I adhered it to the jar and made sure all of the edges were firmly adhered.

xmas jar by candy spiegel3Then, I added a Peel-Off Sticker, from Elizabeth Craft Designs. Carefully use the squeegee from etchall (in photo below) to make sure everything is secure and there are no air bubbles.

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Next, I applied a thick layer of etchall. I pour some into a plastic container and apply it with the squeegee from etchall. A paintbrush just does not seem to get it on thick enough.

Once it is all on, let it sit for 15 minutes.

Then, use the squeegee to scrape it off and put it back into the container (it is reusable!). I then take a paper towel and wipe off as much as I can … this is an acid and it can “etch” your sink if you are not careful. Next, take the jar to sink and run the water and wash off the remaining etchall and remove the stickers and stencils. I then quickly wash the jar with dish soap. It is that easy!

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I did the lid while waiting for the etchall to work. First I cut out a circle from patterned paper and used my Xyron machine to adhere it to the lid. Then, I drilled a hole in the lid for the screw and attached the knob (from Hobby Lobby).

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Once the jar was completely dry, I added Glittered Peel-Off Stickers from Elizabeth Craft Designs. I love these deer and I scattered them around the etched landscape. If you carefully wash the jar, they will remain adhered.

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Then I added a ribbon from Stampin’ Up and some candy and the jar is complete.

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It took less than an hour and used mostly leftover products, so it was practically free! I think it will make a beautiful little gift. What do you think?

(NOTE: I received product from etchall in exchange for this post).

 

 

Crystal Flowers Vase

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It doesn’t take much to turn a plain second-hand vase into a unique work of art.

For this project, I started with a vase I picked up at Goodwill for less than $2. I used washi tape to tape off the area I wanted to etch. Then I used Crystal Flowers Peel-Offs from Elizabeth Craft Designs to create my design.
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Then I coated the entire area with Etchall etching cream. Spread it on thick with a squeegee (a brush will not get it thick enough) and let it sit for 15 minutes. Then scrape it off and put it back in the jar for next time (it’s reusable!!). Wash off the residue and then peel off the tape and stickers ….

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(I put a towel inside so you can see the etching.) But I didn’t stop there … I knew that etching made glass easier to paint because it gives it tooth so the paint can stick. So, I decided to try an experiment — and it worked!

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I painted the area with Distress Paint (Distress Paint is thinner than most acrylic paints and reacts with water while wet … I’m not sure if this technique will work with traditional Distress Paint or not …) As soon as I painted the glass, I took a paper towel and wiped it off. The paint stuck to the etched parts, but not the rest of the glass. If you make a mistake, you can wash it quickly and all of the paint will come off and you can do it again.

After it was completely dry, I sprayed a bit of Windex on a paper towel and used it to get any remnants of paint off of the glass.

I love how much easier the paint made it to see the etching, while still remaining light and transparent. Gorgeous!

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Then I added some May Arts ribbon and some little dots of Liquid Pearls to some of the flowers.

etchall_vase_Candy_Spiegel5I love how it turned out … what do you think?

 

Glasses for the Family

Etchall Glasses

We often have dinner as a family at my in-laws. The family is small … my husband has only one sister, so even with all of our children, there are only 10 of us. Since the family is small enough to fit around the dinner table, we use “real” dishes. We have tried to mark them so we can keep them straight. My mother-in-law made little rings to go around the glasses one year, but we could never remember who had a bell or a tree.

This year, I decided to make monogrammed glasses for everyone to solve this little problem. My first thought was to find pretty, mismatched glasses at a thrift store. But I worried my mother-in-law wouldn’t like a mismatched set. She’s much more formal than I am. So, I decided to buy glasses at a discount store. They came in sets of 4, so I did 12. (and, since they came in boxes, they were easy to wrap)

I used the Cricut Craft Room to create the designs. Most of them were a fancy box with a letter inside. I cut them out in vinyl and then adhered them to the glass … curves are difficult to work on. I kept the monograms small and tried to find the flattest part of the glass to work on.

Then, I added painters’ tape around the vinyl to make sure I didn’t etch any part of the glass I didn’t want to etch.

I used a squeegee to make sure everything was sealed tight and there were no air bubbles anywhere.

Then I applied a thick layer of Etchall and let the glasses sit for 15 minutes. I used a pair of bowl to hold the glasses so they would not roll around. I did them in batches of 4, so the time did not get away from me.

That done, I washed off the cream, pulled off the tape and vinyl and then washed the glasses. Beautiful!